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Date archive for: October 2015

Casting Call for Extraordinary mums-to-be

Posted in Cerebral Palsy, Disability and kids, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Disabled Parent, Family, Fighting for Change, Media, and Motherhood

On behalf of Curve Media

Few mums-to-be would say that pregnancy is easy or stress-free, but for some women, having a baby presents exceptional challenges.

 

Curve Media have been commissioned to make a second series of 6 x 60 minute episodes for Discovery, on the subject of pregnancy called “My Extraordinary Pregnancy”.

 

This factual series will take a look at unusual pregnancies around the world- meeting mums-to-be who are juggling the excitement and anxiety that pregnancy is expected to bring, but who might have an extra ‘something’ to take into account.

 

We’re looking for women who are experiencing their pregnancy with a pre-existing condition or disability of their own (such as dwarfism or visual impairment) or have a condition brought on by the pregnancy (like extreme cravings, or severe morning sickness).

 

We’re also looking for mums-to-be who, might have previously been told they were unlikely to conceive due to unusual gynaecology.

 

Across this observational documentary series, we’ll follow these women through their unusual pregnancies, as they and their families prepare for the birth of their baby. We’re hoping to film with the pregnant mum’s medical practitioners to help the audience understand how the expectant mother’s condition affects her experience of pregnancy medically, while the mum-to-be and their loved ones will take us through the day to day realities of their unusual pregnancy.

 

If you think you may have members, or know of families or individuals, who would be interested in the possibility of our helping them share their pregnancy story, please do call or email the My Extraordinary Pregnancy producers on 0203 179 0099 / extraordinarypregnancies@curvemedia.com – we’d love to hear from you.

 

Please note: We will use and store the personal details contained in your email and any further response, in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998, for the sole purpose of producing the programme.

Giving people with Cerebral Palsy a voice

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disabled Access, Does it wet the bed?, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Making a difference, Media, My writing, and Personal

This week is Cerebral Palsy Awareness Week and today, 7th October, is World CP Day.  As someone with Cerebral Palsy, I’m delighted to be part of such an occasion that will highlight Cerebral Palsy, raise awareness of the condition and celebrate the achievements of those who have CP.

I’ve always found that disability and Cerebral Palsy are viewed in a negative light and both are hugely misunderstood. My recent book, “Does it wet the bed?” highlights the misconceptions that I’ve fought against, the pity which I’ve tried hard to ignore and the discrimination which I’ve refused to let destroy my confidence.  It was really important to me that people knew that having Cerebral Palsy hasn’t held me back or ruined my life.  Far from!  I’ve enjoyed a mainstream education and got a 2:1 Honours degree; held down a full time job before venturing into self-employment and most importantly to me, I’ve become a wife and mother.

As a society, I don’t think disability is discussed enough and World CP Day is a fantastic opportunity for people to learn more about the condition and hopefully, challenge their own perceptions about people with Cerebral Palsy.  I’ll be hosting a live Q&A session on Twitter between 1-2pm GMT (@Aideen23Henry)  so that people can ask questions about Cerebral Palsy, what it’s like to live with the condition and the experiences I’ve had as a result of having Cerebral Palsy. I really hope people will take this opportunity to learn more about it and that this whole week gives people with CP a voice.

But it must go beyond that.  When this week is over, we shouldn’t just forget about it.  We need to get our politicians to understand the issues which people with CP (and other disabilities) face and get them doing more to remove the barriers which still exist within society.  We need to raise awareness with employers and ask them to provide more opportunities to those with Cerebral Palsy. And we need to constantly challenge the perceptions of the general public so that eventually, there are no barriers to people with Cerebral Palsy living fulfilling and rewarding lives.

Why I love having Cerebral Palsy

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability Aids, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Does it wet the bed?, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Media, and Personal

This week is Cerebral Palsy Awareness Week, with tomorrow being World CP Day.  I’ll be live on Twitter between 1-2pm GMT to answer your questions about cerebral palsy, my life living with the condition and about my memoir, “Does it wet the bed?”.  But in the meantime, here’s why I love having Cerebral Palsy. . .

I get to drive without a licence

I’ve failed my actual driving test SEVEN times! But I don’t really mind as I still get to speed around in my Spectra XTR2 wheelchair and go anywhere that I want to go.  Who needs a car?!

I get free botox injections

But not for cosmetic reasons!  Botox can be used to help tight and stiff muscles which is a symptom of cerebral palsy.  I had it to relieve tightness in my arm and it was really effective, giving me back the full use of my arm.

Watching people’s reactions as I get out of my wheelchair and start walking

One of the major misconceptions I come across is that people who use wheelchairs can’t walk.  I love watching the surprise and sometimes apprehension on people’s faces when I suddenly get out of my wheelchair!  After a few seconds of watching their reaction, I reassure them that I’m absolutely fine!

Not having to queue at theme parks

Probably my favourite reason!  I’m a real dare devil, the bigger the ride, the happier I am and not having to queue is certainly a good perk to having a disability!

Being able to disguise when I’m tipsy

My cerebral palsy causes me to tremble quite a bit but when I have a few drinks, it calms my spasms and makes my speech much clearer!  Nobody can tell when I’m a bit worse for wear!