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Date archive for: January 2016

Ten misconceptions about people with disabilities

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Disabled Parent, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Flyinglady Training, Making a difference, and Personal

 

 

  1. Disabled people need someone to talk for them

“Would she like a drink?” or “How old is she?” were common questions posed to my mum when I was growing up.  People assumed just because I am disabled that I can’t speak for myself. I soon piped up with the answers, making sure they knew I had a mind of my own!

 

  1. We need to have a “carer”

Disabled people may need assistance with some daily tasks but it shouldn’t be assumed, as is often the case, that we need full time care. Before getting married, I lived completely independently in my own flat and I am very capable of looking after myself.

 

  1. Disability prevents you from leading a normal life

Disability doesn’t exclude normality! I’ve achieved all the things that anyone else might expect to achieve, my disability hasn’t got in my way.

 

  1. Disabled people aren’t capable of being in employment

This simply isn’t true; there are countless jobs that disabled people can do – employers just need to start putting ability before disability! I held down a full time job for seven years before becoming self-employed and I helped dozens of other disabled people to find employment.

 

  1. People in wheelchairs can’t walk at all

I love the looks of surprise I get when I get out of my wheelchair in the company of strangers!  Wheelchairs are often used because walking is difficult, not because it’s impossible.

 

  1. Disabled people aren’t able to become parents

Being a disabled parent presents additional challenges but with time and thought, these can be overcome.

 

  1. Disabled people will pass on their disabilities to their children

Not all disabilities are hereditary so in many cases, it isn’t possible for a disabled parent to pass on their disability.

 

  1. If you have a disability, you must be on medication

Although medication can sometimes help to control some symptoms of some disabilities, it shouldn’t be assumed that all disabled people take medication. And it definitely shouldn’t be assumed that we can’t enjoy a tipple or two!

 

  1. If you are born with a disability, you’re extremely brave

Lots of people have said to me, “You’re so brave.”  But I don’t see myself as brave because I’ve always had a disability and it’s part of me – I wouldn’t know any different.  If you have a disability, you just get on with life in the best way that you can.

 

  1. Living with a disability is always bad and negative

Far from!  Speaking personally, I wouldn’t change my situation for anything, my life wouldn’t be as good without my disability. Although I’ve experienced discrimination and ignorance, the positive experiences far outweigh the bad.

 

If you have a disability and could add anything to this list, please contact me.  If you’re interested in Disability Awareness Training,  please contact Flyinglady Training.

New writing projects – feedback very welcome!

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability and kids, Disability Awareness, Disabled Parent, Does it wet the bed?, Flyinglady Training, Making a difference, and My writing

This time last year, my new year’s resolution was to get my memoir, “Does it wet the bed?”, published. It was an ambitious goal as the manuscript was barely finished. But with lots of hard work and determination,  I fulfilled my resolution . . . for once!

This year, I have two writing projects which I want to pursue, though I am not going to promise that either will be finished, as I have other work projects in mind.

Firstly, I plan to write a “Disability Etiquette Guide”, to help people gain a better understanding of the issues surrounding disability. I know from experience, lots of people find disability awkward; they don’t know how to approach disabled people and worry about doing or saying the “wrong” thing.  The aim of the guide will be to put people’s minds are rest and to honesty answer the questions that they have.  The guide will cover communicating with disabled people, how and when to offer assistance, the correct language as well as the language to avoid and best practice in a number of situations.

This is my basic plan for the book but I’d really like suggestions from you as to what you would like to see included.  If you have a few minutes and would like to help me, please consider the following questions and contact me with your thoughts:

  • What would you most like to know about disability?
  • What concerns you about interacting with disabled people?
  • What do you think are the common misconceptions about disabled people?

 

I’d really love to hear your thoughts and will do my best to cover all the points I receive.

Secondly, I plan to start a Children’s Book to help teachers and parents to explain disability.  I recently spoke to a mum who was unsure about how to answer her son’s questions about me – she wanted to give him the answers he needed but was worried about offending me. I hope I was able to offer her some reassurance as I explained the best things to say and it cemented my desire to write a book which will help parents to answer those tricky questions with confidence. I haven’t quite decided on the format or style, but if you’re a parent and have any thoughts, please get in touch.

With other training projects and my new role as Trustee of CP Sport, 2016 is set to be a very busy year