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Date archive for: October 2016

Disability Etiquette equals good manners & common sense

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Customer Service, Disability Aids, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Flyinglady Training, Media, and Personal

My latest book, “A disability Etiquette Guide” is something I’ve been wanting to write for a while now and last week, I was reminded why it’s so important for me to write it.

I was on my way to Nottingham, to the Charity CP Sport, of which I am a proud trustee. I asked for the ramp to be put down  as I use an electric wheelchair. It’s a popular train but I was absolutely astounded by my fellow passengers, who proceeded to rush on to the train whilst the customer service guy was attempting to put the ramp into position for me.

They all rushed past him and me, desperate to claim a seat and a place for their luggage. Never mind thinking about me and how it might be easier for me to get into the wheelchair spot when the carriage is relatively clear of passengers and luggage.  Never mind simple manners and common sense.

One passenger even walked up the ramp in front of me! Unbelievable!

And that’s the essence of my book: Good manners and applying common sense can go a long way in improving the lives of those with disabilities.

Yes, I’m Disabled but don’t think I’m stupid

Posted in Cerebral Palsy, Disability and kids, Disability Awareness, Disabled Parent, Does it wet the bed?, Equality & Diversity, Family, and Fighting for Change

It’s 2016 and I’ve now been living with Cerebral Palsy for 33 years.  Attitudes towards disability have changed and largely improved over that time. Yet, it still amazes me how ignorant some people can be and resist being educated.

Yesterday, I was out and about with my mum who has always insisted that she will not speak for me – if somebody wants to know something, they can ask me, not her. As we waited for a bus a fellow passenger asked mum if I was her daughter. Mum politely confirmed that I was, before being asked the old age question, “How old is she?”

I quickly told the woman my age, hoping she would get the message that just because I have a disability, it doesn’t mean that I can’t speak for myself. Far from!  Anyone who knows me or has read my memoir, will know I have my own views and opinions and that I’m not shy in voicing them!

I was hoping to have made my point with this lady but sadly she hadn’t got the hint. She continued to quiz mum about me as if I wasn’t even there! Having experienced this type of ignorance more times than we would have liked, Mum and I were both mildly irritated but also amused by the woman’s inability to take a hint.

Mum decided to put it bluntly: “Actually, SHE is a university graduate with a 2.1 honours degree and is also a married with a child of her own!”

“Where’s her child now then?”

Argh!!!! Some people will never understand or even attempt to put themselves into my shoes but if you’re the lady at the bus stop reading this, let me say this:

 Yes I am disabled, No that doesn’t mean I can’t think or speak for myself, and No it doesn’t entitle you to ask me personal questions that are none of your business!

How many other complete strangers at the bus stop did you ask their age?!