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Category: Accessibility

Wheelchair Woes . . . Sadly Continued

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Cerebral Palsy Sport, Customer Service, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Personal, and Wheelchair

If you have read my last blog, you’ll be aware of my current wheelchair issues and the frustration it’s causing.  At the time of writing my last blog, I stupidly thought I was nearing the end of my issues. Little did I know there was further drama in store.

Frustrated by being told I’d have to wait over two weeks for a part to be shipped from Germany, I decided to pile the pressure on to the manufacturer, Invacare, with regular tweets and emails – highlighting how not having a functional wheelchair was severely impacting upon my independence – please follow @ACBlackborough if you don’t already!

Invacare’s responses were typically along the lines off “we’re sorry and we’re looking into it” which wasn’t really cutting mustard with me at this stage. But then I receive an email, telling me the part would be dispatched that day for delivery tomorrow. Though obviously very happy that two weeks had been reduced to a day, it begged the question why this hadn’t be done to start with? A question which Invacare have declined to answer.

Despite this, I was thrilled at the prospect of getting my wheelchair, and my independence back, after just shy of 5 weeks.  My excitement was dashed when the dealer phoned to break bad news – the part had duly arrived as stated but it was faulty.  After so long, I was unsurprisingly fuming.

Again, Invacare said another part would be despatched for next day delivery. In the five weeks without my wheels, my life had effectively been put on hold. I’d had to cancel numerous plans including work commitments. My spare chair, brought at further expense, is very basic – limiting me to local, essential trips only and even a basic requirement like food shopping, has been really problematic.

So you can imagine my joy when the wheelchair was finally returned to me last Saturday afternoon.  I made plans for the coming week and promised my little boy some trips out.  I committed to attending a meeting in Nottingham, where I am proud chair of Cerebral Palsy Sport.  Life could finally return to normal. Or so I thought.

As soon as I took the wheelchair out, I noticed the battery was behaving oddly – dropping power almost immediately.  Having used electric wheelchairs for the best part of 20 years, I was pretty sure something wasn’t right but I decided to give the chair a couple of long charges before reporting a problem.  Again, I felt limited as to what I was able to do and decided to carry the charger with me, just in case.

When I arrived in Nottingham, the chair was displaying low power so I plugged it in during my meeting and phoned the dealer – Easy Living Mobility – who have been amazing and arranged to visit me the next day.  Despite charging the chair at work, I only just made it home that night – with the chair giving up the ghost on our driveway.

The next day confirmed my fears – the battery was most probably failing and the wheelchair would have to be taken away again to be tested. I’d have to wait 4-5 days for new batteries.  I was utterly fed up – my plans for the next few days turned upside down YET AGAIN.

And what do I get from Invacare?

“We’re working with the Invacare Retailer to resolve this as quickly as possible.”

No apology, no concern for how I’m coping without my lifeline.  I count this now as six weeks – for six weeks I’ve been without a reliable, fit-for-purpose wheelchair but it really seems like Invacare couldn’t give a damn.  They have my money – almost £8000 – and beyond that isn’t their concern.

I’ve only had my wheelchair for 9 months and due to various faults, it has been out of action for 2 of those months.  Considering they talk about keeping people mobile as part of their marketing, I think most would agree that Invacare is failing, miserably.

Wheelchair Woes

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability Aids, Disability Awareness, Fighting for Change, Making a difference, and Wheelchair

 

I recently tweeted about how frustrating life can be as a disabled person but how incredibly grateful I am for having such supportive family and friends. Life as a someone who is reliant upon an electric wheelchair can be very frustrating, particularly when things go wrong.

Almost three weeks ago, I had planned an afternoon out at the park with my little lad and his cousins.  It’s rare that they see each other and I was looking forward to time with my nephews and niece.  But on the way to the park, my wheelchair started cutting out suddenly. I’d turn on the power button again, only for it to cut out again after a few hundred yards. With four children in my care, I didn’t feel safe or in control. Luckily, we were meeting friends at the park but I also rang hubby to walk us back.  The chair progressively got worst and eventually, it wouldn’t move more than a metre without failing.  Hubby resorted to pushing me home and the happy, relaxing day I’d planned ended in frustration.

The wheelchair had only been purchased late in 2017, as I’d decided to leave the Motability Scheme, ironically due to slow and extremely poor customer service.  Unluckily still, the company I’d purchased it from had gone out of business a month after my purchase, meaning I had no support in such instances.  So I found a company, Northwick Associates, who unlike so many companies, were able to come out to me that day.  They seemed to understand the urgency of my predicament.  Unfortunately, the engineer who visited was unable to pinpoint the problem despite his 2 hour visit. Nevertheless, he promised that another engineer would be sent as soon as possible.

Two days later, another engineer arrived who seemed to empathise with me and understand that my electric wheelchair is the absolute key to my independence.  He’d spent time the night before his visit studying the wheelchair manuals to try and find the problem.  With some wriggles and jiggles, it seemed he had cleared the error and just to be sure, I did a short test drive and the chair was back to normal.  I was over the moon to have my independence back – it’s hard for me to convey the relief knowing my life is back to normal. Some may think I’m exaggerating but imagine someone taking your car keys or your wallet – how would that impact upon your life?

But my joy was short-lived as the next evening, Friday, the chair began cutting out again as I went to visit my parents. I rang Northwick again only to be told that unfortunately no engineers were available until Monday – at the earliest.  Imagine your car breaking down and phoning the AA or RAC, only to be told you’d have to wait two days for any assistance?!

I should explain that due to previous issues with my wheelchair, we did purchase a very basic back-up replacement in January just to ensure that I’d never be totally housebound. I soon realised though that it was literally to allow me to do the essentials locally – it is very basic and has very little umph!  Try going from driving a brand new Mercedes to a Fiesta and you’ll be on my wavelength.

Monday morning arrives and I’m on the phone again to Northwick but as timing has it, the engineers are on training and unavailable to visit until Wednesday – when not one but two engineers arrive.  Surely between them, I thought, they would identify the problem?  Unfortunately – I’m using that word a lot – they concluded that they would have to take the chair away to strip it down.

I was truly exasperated at this point – if only I’d known how far I was from a conclusion!  Three days later the engineer texted to say the fault had been found, repaired and the chair was ready. Hubby and I decided to collect it ourselves as to save some time.  Once again, the relief of getting my Mercedes back was immense!  But hubby aired caution when I mulled over a solo trip to town.

Wisely so. The next day, as I returned from the local shops, the chair started behaving weirdly – but not quite as before. I hoped it was me imagining the worst until the next day. I was doing the school run and got as far as the school grounds when the chair cut out totally, just as before. My little boy’s teacher approached to see if she could help and I had to try so hard not to disgrace myself in front of her but instead I fought to hold back tears as I tried to explain.

Having managed to get safely home thanks to hubby and a friend, I knew I needed to compose myself before once again phoning Northwick. I should stress I didn’t blame them as they had been more responsive than anyone I’d dealt with in the past, but I was to put it mildly, very frustrated at this point.

Northwick admitted they were now at a lost and offered to contact the manufacturer, Invacare, on my behalf as the chair was still under warranty. Another few days are lost until they send out an engineer.

YET AGAIN, I’m told the chair will be taken away for a thorough investigation. My only consolation is that I’m informed now that the warranty should cover it.  I’m sort of pleased to say the fault has finally being identified, but wait for it. Here comes the icing on the cake.  The replacement part I need isn’t stocked in the UK and has to be ordered from GERMANY. Yes and it was only ordered yesterday. And, oh yes, they are unable or more likely, unwilling to give an expected time of arrival.

Three and a half weeks without my wheels, my independence, my ability to travel and take my little boy to school safely – and that’s all I get.

I saw a tweet quite recently that essentially implied that disabled people should be grateful and satisfied with the progress this country has made in the last two decades to improve disability equality.

I’d have to respectfully disagree.

Challenges of a Disabled Mum: Game of Cat & Mouse!

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability and kids, Disabled Parent, Family, Flyinglady Training, Motherhood, My writing, and Personal

Like most parents, I’m breathing a sigh of relief now that the kids are back at school. It’s a challenge for any parent, trying to keep kids entertained whilst not spending an absolute fortune. This was also the first time that I felt confident in taking Jack out and about independently, using public transport – though you might like to read more about that particular issue here. Jack is now of an age where, for the most part, he listens to me and understands the need to stay close to me when we’re out. With the exception of the soft play, that is.

On the last day of the holidays, I decided to treat him to a McDonald’s followed by a session in the soft play centre. We normally go and meet other kids and their mums, so he has someone to play with and I have the moral support of other parents. I wasn’t entirely sure if it would work on his own but as the weather was dodgy, I decided it was a good way to pass a few hours.

I made sure Jack knew where I was and that he needed to listen out for the lady, who would call out our colour when it was time to leave. All was well and I kept an eye on him from where I was sitting. Jack kept coming back to me, mostly to complain that he was hungry! But time ticked on and it was almost time to go so I decided to gather our things and get Jack out.

As it had got slightly quieter, they weren’t enforcing the time limit so Jack had no way of knowing when to come out. So I went to the edge of the play area and starting trying to get his attention. But do you think I could catch his eye or make him hear as I called! Nope! It was like a game of cat and mouse – he’d run the other way just as I’d got in a position to catch his eye! He couldn’t hear me call him above all the noise and after 10 minutes or so, I was ready to give up! Then another mum kindly offered to go in and tell him to come to me.

Another cat and mouse game commenced as she entered the soft play and tried to find him for me. She was anxious about approaching the wrong child, as I tried to follow her and she pointed kids out! I was now trying to keep track of two people from the ground and directing her towards him! It was all quite funny but eventually the kind lady tracked Jack down and he came out.

It’s not a major issue and it provided some entertainment but it’s just one of the things that make me slightly anxious about venturing out alone – those unexpected challenges!

Open Letter to Uber: Your failure of a Disabled Customer

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Making a difference, Media, Personal, and Public Transport

Last weekend was rare for me. I was really looking forward to a short break in London, visiting one of my oldest friends and my sister. I have Cerebral Palsy and a four year old son, so taking a break is a real treat.

We’d arranged a night out and as a wheelchair user, this takes some planning but my best mate had it all in hand. As there was a large group of us, we booked two of your taxis in advance. One to take the majority of our group and the other, an accessible vehicle to accommodate me and my friend; we even got a text to confirm our booking.

As I believe is your standard practice, five minutes before our requested slot, we got another text indicating that you were on your way. So we piled outside just to be ready and the other taxi for our friends arrived. However, our advanced booked accessible vehicle was nowhere to be seen. We waited and waited. No more texts pinged and still we waited. Half an hour later, it was evident that we had been forgotten. There was no way of contacting you to let you know that a vulnerable, disabled customer had just been left high and dry. For had I been alone (as I mostly am in my travels around the country), that’s exactly what I’d have been. Alone and vulnerable, with no way of letting you know of your unforgiveable mistake. Luckily for you, I had my friend to ensure that I wasn’t just left on a dark street, in an unfamiliar city with no way of getting to my destination.

In case you’re interested, we did eventually get to where our party had been waiting over an hour. However, because we couldn’t get an accessible cab, I had to go without my electric wheelchair, which made it difficult and took the shine off what should have been a great night out with my friends.

But I’m afraid my complaint doesn’t stop there. Your initial response when my friend made contact was, as he described it, lacklustre:

So sorry to hear that you did not meet your friends on time.

Although you have requested uberAccess in advance, unfortunately, there’s no available driver-partner to accept your requests that is why it was unfulfilled.

Feedback like yours helps us optimise the pickup experience. We appreciate your patience and understanding.”

 

So if there wasn’t a vehicle available, why did we receive a text five minutes beforehand?

And secondly, you don’t have our patience or understanding. You left us waiting, with no way of contacting you or of getting to our destination. And you ruined our night.

Your response shows a total disregard and ignorance for what you actually did which was to ignore the request of a vulnerable, disabled wheelchair user. Had I been alone, I wouldn’t have known where to go or what to do.

In further correspondence, you go on to suggest we may have misunderstood how the Uber App works and the messages it generates. This is your issue, not ours and the fact remains you have let down a disabled customer at a time when your very presence in London is under threat.

Cerebral Palsy: The good, the bad and everything in between

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Education, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Flyinglady Training, Making a difference, My writing, Personal, Social Model of Disability, Uncategorised, and World CP Day

This is my life, my feelings, my achievements and frustrations of living with Cerebral Palsy

Campaigning – I’ve spent the last ten years supporting and campaigning for the rights of Disabled People. I ran a campaign to improve the accessibility of my local area – taking it as far as No. 10 Downing Street.  Find information about my “Great Barr Great” Campaign here

Exhausting – Having CP means every day tasks can take me longer and I get tired easily. But I don’t let it stop me!

Rebel – You tell me, “You can’t” and I’ll tell you, “Just watch me!” I thrive on proving people wrong and achieving what might be considered the impossible!

Exciting – I truly believe my life wouldn’t be as fulfilling and as exciting as it is without my Cerebral Palsy. Life has taken me down many exciting paths so far and I’m grateful for that.

Brave – Please don’t call me brave. I’ve always had CP and I’m just living my life the only way I’ve ever known – I’m not brave or special. I’m just Aideen.

Regrets? – Would I have a life without CP if I could? Not a chance. It’s made me who I am and I wouldn’t change that.

Awareness – My training business is focused on raising awareness of disability and making life easier for other disabled people by changing attitudes. And believe me when I say, here in 2017, that there’s still a lot of work to be done in changing how people view disability.

Living – I’m just trying to live my life. I hope World CP Day will make that a little easier by making people more aware of CP and it’s implications.

 

Passionate – I’m guessing you know by now the passion I have for making a difference to the lives of others with disabilities. The Social Model of Disability made huge headway in changing the way society views disability but unfortunately, discrimination is still occurring regularly. This has to change and disabled people have to be put on an equal footing with everyone else in society.

Accessibility – Getting around in a wheelchair is far from simple and I think I’m getting a name for myself in trying to identify and put right the problems! The Equality Act 2010 intended to address such issues and yet I still find accessibility issues a major barrier to me leading a “normal” life – whatever that is!

Lonely – I don’t mean this in the traditional sense, but sometimes it can feel quite lonely fighting for change and it can feel like an uphill struggle. World CP Day is an opportunity for people to pull together and raise awareness in oppose to being a lone voice, as it often feels.

Scary – There are times, when as confident as I am, having Cerebral Palsy can be scary. When I’m meeting someone new and not sure if they will understand my speech; when I’m in a new environment and unsure how others will react to me. Awareness of CP really helps take away that fear.

Yes – My mum always told me there was no such word as can’t so if I can find a way to do things, the answer is always yes!

 

See what I did there?!

 

If you or someone you know has CP, please get in touch and if there’s anything I can help you with just let me know.

Corporate training and support also available – please contact Flyinglady.

Guest Blog: Thomas Talbot – My Racerunning Story

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Cerebral Palsy Sport, Disability Aids, Disability and kids, Disabled Access, Family, Racerunning, and Uncategorised

Thomas Talbot is 13 years old and has Cerebral Palsy – it hasn’t stopped him from becoming a successful international Racerunner. Here’s his story. . .

My story

Picking up my new RaceRunner

Hi – my name is Thomas. I’m 13 years old and I live near Lincoln. I am an International RaceRunner and I have cerebral palsy. I have to use a walker to get around and I sometime use a wheelchair if I get tired.

RaceRunning is an athletics discipline with a three wheeled trike and no pedals. Athletes can run on the track or use it for therapy.

I first discovered RaceRunning when I went to watch a Cerebral Palsy Sport athletics competition in Gateshead in August 2013. There were two RaceRunners competing and I was absolutely captivated by it. It looked such fun and looked like it could be something I could do. The boy that was racing was just like me – using a walker and I just loved the look of it. I badgered my Mum about it for some weeks about it after that!

My 2015 haul of silverware!

I went to a Cerebral Palsy Sport taster day in February 2014 and tried it for the first time. Wow – it was so exciting and I loved the feeling of being able to run without my walker. Then I went to a couple more taster days through 2014 and I told my parents I wanted my own RaceRunnner which we fundraised for and in April 2014 I collected my very own RaceRunner.

I don’t think at that time I knew where it would lead. The physio I had then kept saying that she thought I was getting a little stronger by using it and all I knew was that I loved doing it and it was better than painful physio.

I competed in my first RaceRunning competition in May 2015 in Manchester and then competed the whole season in different places including the CP Nationals. I won four events for Under 13’s and I was also awarded the Colin Rains Trophy for endeavour in my first season. I also won my District Young Achiever of the Year Award in 2015.

European Championships 2016

Sadly I had to have a big hip operation in January 2017 and I was in a hip spica for 6 weeks as they took some bone from my leg and grafted it into my hip. For all those days in the hospital and then recovering at home, all I wanted to do was be back on the RaceRunner (and also watching my beloved Manchester United). During my recovery we worked hard to build up strength as I have quite a leg length difference and this meant hydrotherapy as well as painful physio. But thanks to a good friend I got to see England and Manchester united play football!
I wasn’t able to compete this year until September and I really missed my friends. When I returned back to track racing at the Nationals, I won four golds in the Under 16 age group and nearly beat most of my PBs. I did not expect that!

The RaceRunnner helps me move so easily when I am on the track. I can run with the RaceRunner but can’t do that as easy with my walker. It gives me freedom. I use a chest plate and back strap so my physio also says it helps with my posture and the strength around my middle. I just love to run!

I train two to three times a week in Lincolnshire depending on homework and also what competitions are coming up. If I have training or a competition at the weekend I only train twice in the week.

European Championships 2016

I’m hoping to be selected to go to the CP World Games in Spain in 2018 and represent England. I have made the long list so really crossing fingers for final selection. I was too young when it was in Nottingham in 2015. To be selected – well that would be fab!

I wouldn’t be where I am today without the support of my family and friends. I’ve made so many friends who are just like me and I don’t feel quite so alone. I know when I get to the track or at a competitions I’m going to see them and enjoy having a laugh with them…as well as racing. It has made me much fitter since I started RaceRunning.

I feel much better about myself and more confident. I have made a lot more friends and love spending time with them at the track. I think it has made me believe in myself abit more. I am much more outgoing than I was before I started RaceRunning and I like going to different places to compete. The trip out to Denmark as an England team was awesome and we did have lots of fun!

Challenges of a Disabled Mum: The School Run

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Disabled Parent, Education, and Family

How the time flies! It doesn’t seem five minutes since I was breastfeeding and watching my little boy learning to walk. Now, he’s just started school and I’m just like any other mum doing the school run every day.

Well, not quite. The school run can be stressful enough but add a wheelchair to the mix and stress levels go through the roof! Luckily, Jack went to nursery school last year so he loves school and has settled into Reception brilliantly. But the rush of excited children and their parents has made the morning drop off quite difficult. Particularly as the route to Jack’s classroom is through the nursery area and the door had been propped open with a box of toys, limiting the width of the door!

However, I knew the school were very supportive of me so a quick email sorted out the door issue. Now to just try and drop little man off without running over any little toes! I try to get to school early so that we’re first in and at least I can say goodbye to Jack and then very slowly make my way out, facing the stampede of children!

I try to leave Jack at the classroom door as if I do go in, I find it difficult to manoeuvre around and watch for little people, who don’t yet have an awareness of me!! Then I try to find a quite space to let everyone else pass, before leaving the building. By the time I get home, my nerves are shot and I’m just relieved to have done another successful drop off without incident!

There’s no answer to this, children are children and it’s on me just to be very careful. But I do wish I had eyes in the back of my head!

Open Letter to All Bus Drivers – from a Wheelchair User Passenger

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Customer Service, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Education, Equality & Diversity, Personal, and Public Transport

You see me waiting at the bus stop and I try to search your face for a clue as to which camp you fit into.  You see, you fit into two camps and sometimes I can’t tell until you pull up and open the doors. All the time, I’m filled with dread and anxiousness, wondering if this time I’ll have a fight on my hands. Whether I’ll be welcomed or made to feel like a complete and utter nuisance.  Quite often it’s the latter.

Some of you are friendly, welcoming and seem to understand that I have as much right as anyone else to use public transport.  You go out of your way to gently lower the ramp for me, to ask where I’m getting off and to make sure that the wheelchair space is clear.  If it’s occupied by a pushchair, you politely ask them to move or fold it up.  You kindly help me to position my chair into the sometimes stupidly difficult spaces which aren’t really suitable for wheelchairs at all.  When I get off, you share a friendly word and wish me well.  I feel like a valued passenger.

Unfortunately, I don’t feel as welcomed by some of your uneducated colleagues who openly grimace when they see me waiting for their bus.  One of two things can happen at this point.  They either refuse to let me on, saying their bus is too full or that the wheelchair space is full.  They seemed to have completely missed the memo that the wheelchair space is for the use of wheelchair users and that this is law.  They refuse to ask other passengers to move, for fear that heaven forbid, their bus might end up late or their shift might overrun.

Or they make it crystal clear that I’m a nuisance for needing their assistance.  They huff and puff as they climb out of their cab, then slam the ramp down in front of me. They don’t care if other passengers are blocking the wheelchair space, which I’m supposed to reverse into.  That’s my problem, I’m supposed to ensure I’m safe and ask fellow passengers to move, even at peak times.  I’m made to feel like an inconvenience, a problem and I’ll tell you now – it makes me feel like utter crap.  That’s probably the first time I’m sworn on my blog but it’s the only way to convey how it makes me feel.

How I feel when that treatment makes me late for work or late to collect my son from school.  Yes, that’s right, I’m just like you. I have commitments and I’m trying to get somewhere just like everyone else.  I’d like to get home after a day’s work, just like you.  I’d like to get home without dealing with your attitude because it STINKS.

So thank-you so much if you fall into the first camp; you make my life as a disabled wheelchair user so much easier.

May I suggest, that if you sadly fall into the second, that you consider a career change.  You’ve clearly misunderstood that your job isn’t about just driving a bus. It’s about transporting passengers – whether we’re disabled or not.

My “PIP” journey: Please don’t treat me as a number

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, and Personal

Tomorrow is my PIP assessment and for those who are not familiar, PIP stands for “Personal Independence Payment” and is replacing Disability Living Allowance (DLA).

I’m nervous for two reasons: a) I’ve heard and read about many people who have had a bad experience of the PIP assessment process and b) my experience thus far hasn’t been great. When I phoned to start my application, the delightful lady I spoke to was more like a robot than a human being. She refused to listen to me or answer my questions until she had completed her “script” and the whole conversation felt very impersonal and forced. It didn’t fill me with confidence for the rest of the process, put it that way.

Regardless of the assessment outcome, I just hope I’m listened to tomorrow and not just treated as a “number”. I hope the assessor understands the complexity of disability and isn’t just fixated on the medical side.  I hope they take the time to listen to my speech and not rely on my husband as an interpreter. I hope they appreciate that my disability is different from day to day and that 15 minutes cannot paint an accurate picture of living with Cerebral Palsy every day.

Most of all I hope I’m treated as a human being!! More to follow!

Building an inclusive, more tolerant future

Posted in Accessibility, Disability and kids, Disability Awareness, Education, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Media, and Schools

I just posted on my Flyinglady Website about how I love going into schools and doing Disability Awareness sessions for the children; I’m so passionate about it that I offer the sessions for free wherever I possibly can.

The sessions help kids to understand that everyone is different and that’s a good thing; life would be incredibly boring if we were all carbon copies of each other.  I go on to try and help the kids to understand how they help people with disabilities and explain how including everybody is so important.  Inclusiveness, in simple, age appropriate language.

Now, as I sit watching the news of yet another, hate driven, evil terrorist attack, I feel despair the same of everyone else. I fear for my little boy and a friend tweets her advice that “All we can do is be the change and teach our children better. The majority of people are good.”

And we are.  The world is full of good, kind, peace loving people and we need to teach our kids – our future – to be the same. Teach them that it’s OK to ask questions, to be curious and that they must be accepting of differences. We need to teach them from a young age about diversity and that age, sex, disability, ethnicity, sexuality and religion make each of us who we are. We’re all different, all unique but ultimately, we’re all human beings and that’s the bottom line which needs to be respected.

So let’s have Disability Awareness on the curriculum but let’s also give Equality and Diversity generally a higher priority from a young age.  Let’s invite a range of people, from all walks of life, to give presentations to schools and allow our children to explore these issues. Let them ask the questions that perhaps their parents would struggle to answer. Let them learn from personal experiences, not just teachers and books.  Perhaps adopting such an approach will help us create a much more tolerate society for our future.