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Category archive for: Fighting for Change

Building an inclusive, more tolerant future

Posted in Accessibility, Disability and kids, Disability Awareness, Education, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Media, and Schools

I just posted on my Flyinglady Website about how I love going into schools and doing Disability Awareness sessions for the children; I’m so passionate about it that I offer the sessions for free wherever I possibly can.

The sessions help kids to understand that everyone is different and that’s a good thing; life would be incredibly boring if we were all carbon copies of each other.  I go on to try and help the kids to understand how they help people with disabilities and explain how including everybody is so important.  Inclusiveness, in simple, age appropriate language.

Now, as I sit watching the news of yet another, hate driven, evil terrorist attack, I feel despair the same of everyone else. I fear for my little boy and a friend tweets her advice that “All we can do is be the change and teach our children better. The majority of people are good.”

And we are.  The world is full of good, kind, peace loving people and we need to teach our kids – our future – to be the same. Teach them that it’s OK to ask questions, to be curious and that they must be accepting of differences. We need to teach them from a young age about diversity and that age, sex, disability, ethnicity, sexuality and religion make each of us who we are. We’re all different, all unique but ultimately, we’re all human beings and that’s the bottom line which needs to be respected.

So let’s have Disability Awareness on the curriculum but let’s also give Equality and Diversity generally a higher priority from a young age.  Let’s invite a range of people, from all walks of life, to give presentations to schools and allow our children to explore these issues. Let them ask the questions that perhaps their parents would struggle to answer. Let them learn from personal experiences, not just teachers and books.  Perhaps adopting such an approach will help us create a much more tolerate society for our future.

Why I love being a trustee of Cerebral Palsy Sport

Posted in Cerebral Palsy, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Does it wet the bed?, Fighting for Change, Making a difference, My writing, and Personal

At the book launch of my memoir, Does it wet the bed?, someone happened to mention to me a Charity, Cerebral Palsy Sport and how they were looking for new trustees. I almost dismissed the idea; I had never been a sporty person, much to my regret. I wasn’t sure how much I’d have to offer such a charity.

Then I thought back to my time working for another disability charity who focused on helping disabled people into employment.  As an employee, it was sometimes frustrating as I’d have a vision for how I thought the organisation should go but no real authority to influence it’s direction.  When the charity struggled financially and my job was hanging by a thread from month to month, all I could do was do my job and hope funding would come our way – even though I had endless ideas for stabilising the charity and indeed, expanding it.

So I realised it didn’t matter that I didn’t spend my weekends by the side of a pitch – what mattered was I had the drive, the passion and the enthusiasm to make a difference to a charity. I could help other people with Cerebral Palsy to reach their sporting potential and that was what inspired me to apply.

I was thrilled to take up my role as Trustee last January and though it’s a big responsibility, I can honestly say that I’ve loved every moment so far.  I’ve put my current skills to good use and am continually developing my skills and experience, which will only strengthen my CV.  I’ve met some brilliant people and most of all, I hope, I’ve made a difference for the people using our services.  Every day is different, challenging and rewarding – even it is just a simple “thank-you” and a smile.

Yes, the role takes up my time. The usual commitment is 6 Board Meetings per year, plus 4-6 Sub-Committees Meetings per year but if you have this time to give, there’s nowhere better to give it! All your expenses will be paid and you’ll be invited to some brilliant sporting and fundraising events that are family-friendly and lots of fun!

So why not come and join us?!  To apply to be a trustee, please follow this link or you can contact me for a chat if you’d like more information.

Disability Etiquette equals good manners & common sense

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Customer Service, Disability Aids, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Flyinglady Training, Media, and Personal

My latest book, “A disability Etiquette Guide” is something I’ve been wanting to write for a while now and last week, I was reminded why it’s so important for me to write it.

I was on my way to Nottingham, to the Charity CP Sport, of which I am a proud trustee. I asked for the ramp to be put down  as I use an electric wheelchair. It’s a popular train but I was absolutely astounded by my fellow passengers, who proceeded to rush on to the train whilst the customer service guy was attempting to put the ramp into position for me.

They all rushed past him and me, desperate to claim a seat and a place for their luggage. Never mind thinking about me and how it might be easier for me to get into the wheelchair spot when the carriage is relatively clear of passengers and luggage.  Never mind simple manners and common sense.

One passenger even walked up the ramp in front of me! Unbelievable!

And that’s the essence of my book: Good manners and applying common sense can go a long way in improving the lives of those with disabilities.

Yes, I’m Disabled but don’t think I’m stupid

Posted in Cerebral Palsy, Disability and kids, Disability Awareness, Disabled Parent, Does it wet the bed?, Equality & Diversity, Family, and Fighting for Change

It’s 2016 and I’ve now been living with Cerebral Palsy for 33 years.  Attitudes towards disability have changed and largely improved over that time. Yet, it still amazes me how ignorant some people can be and resist being educated.

Yesterday, I was out and about with my mum who has always insisted that she will not speak for me – if somebody wants to know something, they can ask me, not her. As we waited for a bus a fellow passenger asked mum if I was her daughter. Mum politely confirmed that I was, before being asked the old age question, “How old is she?”

I quickly told the woman my age, hoping she would get the message that just because I have a disability, it doesn’t mean that I can’t speak for myself. Far from!  Anyone who knows me or has read my memoir, will know I have my own views and opinions and that I’m not shy in voicing them!

I was hoping to have made my point with this lady but sadly she hadn’t got the hint. She continued to quiz mum about me as if I wasn’t even there! Having experienced this type of ignorance more times than we would have liked, Mum and I were both mildly irritated but also amused by the woman’s inability to take a hint.

Mum decided to put it bluntly: “Actually, SHE is a university graduate with a 2.1 honours degree and is also a married with a child of her own!”

“Where’s her child now then?”

Argh!!!! Some people will never understand or even attempt to put themselves into my shoes but if you’re the lady at the bus stop reading this, let me say this:

 Yes I am disabled, No that doesn’t mean I can’t think or speak for myself, and No it doesn’t entitle you to ask me personal questions that are none of your business!

How many other complete strangers at the bus stop did you ask their age?!

A little bit of knowledge . . .

Posted in Customer Service, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Equality & Diversity, and Fighting for Change

As a disabled person, I consider myself to be fairly lucky.  Yes, I face physical challenges on a daily basis but they haven’t stopped me from living a fulfilling life, getting a good education, raising my own family or running my own training business. I was fortunate enough to be born at a time when people’s attitudes towards disability were beginning to change and being disabled wasn’t seen as such a tragedy.

But, even now, some thirty years on, some people’s attitudes are firmly stuck in the past, in a time when the Medical Model of Disability dominated and disability was viewed as an individual problem, rather than a challenge for society to overcome.  In the space of just a few weeks, I’ve experienced three different incidents where customer facing staff have failed to cater for my disability, causing upset and distress.  In the first incident, the staff member didn’t have the patience to just listen to what I was saying, instead expecting a family member to speak for me.  In a second, similar incident, the staff member made absolutely no effort to understand me and refused to let me talk to another member of staff. With the third incident, I was made to feel like a nuisance simply because I required a ramp in order to access a service.  In all three cases, it was absolutely clear that the staff members hadn’t received Disability Awareness Training or at most, had fallen asleep in the middle of it.  This despite the fact that disabled people in the UK have a huge spending power (£80bn I’m told) so an investment in such training would pay off in no time.

So yes, I still consider myself lucky, but it is attitudes which still need to change.  A little bit of knowledge would go a long way in improving the lives of disabled people even more . . .