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Category archive for: Media

Building an inclusive, more tolerant future

Posted in Accessibility, Disability and kids, Disability Awareness, Education, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Media, and Schools

I just posted on my Flyinglady Website about how I love going into schools and doing Disability Awareness sessions for the children; I’m so passionate about it that I offer the sessions for free wherever I possibly can.

The sessions help kids to understand that everyone is different and that’s a good thing; life would be incredibly boring if we were all carbon copies of each other.  I go on to try and help the kids to understand how they help people with disabilities and explain how including everybody is so important.  Inclusiveness, in simple, age appropriate language.

Now, as I sit watching the news of yet another, hate driven, evil terrorist attack, I feel despair the same of everyone else. I fear for my little boy and a friend tweets her advice that “All we can do is be the change and teach our children better. The majority of people are good.”

And we are.  The world is full of good, kind, peace loving people and we need to teach our kids – our future – to be the same. Teach them that it’s OK to ask questions, to be curious and that they must be accepting of differences. We need to teach them from a young age about diversity and that age, sex, disability, ethnicity, sexuality and religion make each of us who we are. We’re all different, all unique but ultimately, we’re all human beings and that’s the bottom line which needs to be respected.

So let’s have Disability Awareness on the curriculum but let’s also give Equality and Diversity generally a higher priority from a young age.  Let’s invite a range of people, from all walks of life, to give presentations to schools and allow our children to explore these issues. Let them ask the questions that perhaps their parents would struggle to answer. Let them learn from personal experiences, not just teachers and books.  Perhaps adopting such an approach will help us create a much more tolerate society for our future.

Meryl Streep should be applauded for challenging Mr.Trump

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability Awareness, Disabled Parent, Media, My writing, and Personal

I don’t normally write about anything remotely political on my blog – preferring instead to make the odd rant on Facebook, if something really bothers me.  But this week, something and someone political has tipped me over the edge because it’s more than just politics – it’s about equality.  Anyone know where I’m at yet?

Yes, that’s right: Donald Trump, our US president-elect. Meryl Streep has used her Global Globe acceptance speech to attack Mr. Trump for mocking a disabled journalist working for the New York Times, Serge Kovaleski, who dared to report on Trump’s claim that thousands of US Muslims celebrated the collapse of the World Trade Centre.

Streep said she was heartbroken by Trumps imitation of the journalist and I absolutely applaud her comments. I am extremely proud and thankful that someone who has influence has been brave enough to bring this to the forefront of the media’s attention again.  But her comments have also being endlessly criticised, with many saying Streep could have used her to speech to urge Trump to promote equality and unity going forward. Many people were extremely critical of this pitiful man during the election campaign, but now, suddenly we’re meant to get behind him and hope against hope, that everything will be OK?

I strongly disagree. It is wrong and cowardly for anyone to sweep this behaviour under the carpet, just because in 7 days time this rude and ignorant man will be the (so-called) most powerful man in the world.  Why does that give him the right to abuse woman, mock disabled people and generally disrespect anyone who doesn’t agree with him?

In Trump’s defence, people have claimed he’s mocked others in exactly the same way and Trump himself has said he wasn’t mocking him but I think I may just send Mr. Trump a dictionary as an inauguration gift. Claiming to “not know” about Kovaleski’s condition is no excuse (not that I believe him) – when you’re in the position Trump was and is now in, you make it your business to know.

As a disabled person with Cerebral Palsy and a woman, Trump has shocked and offended me numerous times; the fact he is about to become US President is unbelievable. But this is what’s worse: disabled people have fought for years and are still fighting for equality and to be accepted into society. Yet Trump, the soon-to-be most influential man in the world, and his fans think it’s acceptable to mock disability and then defend his actions. And then they attack someone who is prepared to make a stand for disabled people.

I fear for America and equality over the next for years.  Well done Meryl for making a stand,

Disability Etiquette equals good manners & common sense

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Customer Service, Disability Aids, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Equality & Diversity, Fighting for Change, Flyinglady Training, Media, and Personal

My latest book, “A disability Etiquette Guide” is something I’ve been wanting to write for a while now and last week, I was reminded why it’s so important for me to write it.

I was on my way to Nottingham, to the Charity CP Sport, of which I am a proud trustee. I asked for the ramp to be put down  as I use an electric wheelchair. It’s a popular train but I was absolutely astounded by my fellow passengers, who proceeded to rush on to the train whilst the customer service guy was attempting to put the ramp into position for me.

They all rushed past him and me, desperate to claim a seat and a place for their luggage. Never mind thinking about me and how it might be easier for me to get into the wheelchair spot when the carriage is relatively clear of passengers and luggage.  Never mind simple manners and common sense.

One passenger even walked up the ramp in front of me! Unbelievable!

And that’s the essence of my book: Good manners and applying common sense can go a long way in improving the lives of those with disabilities.

Please offer me a seat – improving travel for disabled people?

Posted in Accessibility, Customer Service, Disability Awareness, Disabled Access, Disabled Parent, Equality & Diversity, Flyinglady Training, Media, Personal, and Public Transport

 

Whilst browsing through my twitter account yesterday, I became aware of a new scheme which Transport for London are trialling, which encourages passengers to give up their seat for someone who needs it more, particularly disabled passengers.  Participating passengers will have a card and wear a badge, saying “Please offer me a seat.”

As a disabled wheelchair user who regularly uses public transport, albeit not in London much, I have very mixed feelings about this.  Although I am fortunate enough to at least always have my own seat, (thankfully!)  I am often left very frustrated by my fellow passengers attitudes, who fail to consider my needs by pushing on to trains or buses in front of me and using the designated wheelchair space as a dumping ground for their luggage. (Rather than taking the time to put it in the designated space for luggage)  It is much easier to manoeuvre my wheelchair before everyone else gets on but few people ever consider this.

So on the one hand, I think Transport for London should be generously applauded for taking the initiative to improve things for disabled people; they have identified this as a significant problem and are taking proactive steps to improve the experience for disabled passengers, particularly those who may not feel confident in speaking up to tell people what they need.

But on the other hand, I feel sad and frustrated that it’s considered that such schemes are needed. If people were more considerate and thoughtful, we would all have a much more positive experience of public transport, including disabled people.  If we all moved as far as possible, leaving the front seats available for those who need them, as is the intention, there would be less need for people to move – and be torn away from their Smart Phones! 🙂

Common sense also plays a big part.  We all need to be aware of those around us and be prepared to assist those who may need a seat or even assistance with luggage etc.

I think many disabled people may also feel self-conscious about wearing a badge which advertises the fact that they have a disability. Others may feel cheeky about asking for a seat, particularly if their disability isn’t immediately obvious. And although I understand that the scheme relies upon goodwill, unfortunately this isn’t always forthcoming and some disabled people may fear confrontation from those who question their greater need for a seat.

Despite my reservations, I hope the scheme is successful and at the very least, encourages people to be a little more considerate of the needs of their fellow passengers.

Now proud Trustee of Cerebral Palsy Sport

Posted in Accessibility, Cerebral Palsy, Disability and kids, Disability Awareness, Media, and Personal

At my book launch back in September, one of my guests told me about a charity which was looking for new trustees – Cerebral Palsy Sport.  I wasn’t sure though.  I’ve never been into sport and I wasn’t sure if I’d have the time to commit to the charity.

Nonetheless, I decided to take a look at the CP Sport website and I have to say, I was interested. The main focus of the organisation is support people with Cerebral Palsy to reach their sporting potential and to improve their quality of life through sport, physical activity and active recreation.  Having worked in a charity for seven years previously, I felt I’d have something to offer them, even if I wasn’t especially sporty!   After a phone call with the CEO, I was hooked and decided to put in an application.

After a very friendly and welcoming interview, I am proud to say that I’ve been appointed on to the board and am looking forward to the new challenges which lie ahead. My first being to support the Charity with its “Get. Set. Raise” Appeal this March – which is also Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month.

The aim of the appeal is to raise £10,000 and there’s 3 main ways that people can get involved:

  • “Do your bit in your sports kit”  – go to work or school in your sports kit and make a donation;
  • Organise a sports themed event – bake sale, sports quiz or a mini-Olympics;
  • Take on a personal challenge – the choice is yours!!

 

I’m proud to be apart of this brilliant charity and would urge you to get involved too!